WLP

 

Country: Global

Organization: Women’s Learning Partnership (WLP)

 

Women’s Learning Partnership (WLP) is a non-profit organization that works to empower women and girls around the world. WLP is a partnership of 20 organizations in the developing world, primarily in Muslim-majority societies, who work together to provide skills and trainings that enable women to gain positions of leadership and participate in decisions that impact their lives. WLP uses technology to create networks and mobilizes grassroots women to bring about positive change in public opinion, laws, and policies in order to build democratic, tolerant, and inclusive societies.

 

For Rights, Development, and Peace

 

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As Instability Grows, IMF Loan Could Threaten Egypt’s Most Vulnerable

Posted on 29 June 2013 by wlp

By Olivia Alabaster, on behalf of WLP Lebanon/CRTD.A

Saturday, June 29

CAIRO: The implications of an IMF loan package to Egypt were discussed in further detail on the second day of a regional conference on economic justice and women’s rights Saturday organised by CRTD.A/WLP-Lebanon.

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Amidst New Waves of Protest, Activists Consider Economic Justice & Women’s Rights

Posted on 28 June 2013 by wlp

By Olivia Alabaster, on behalf of WLP Lebanon/CRTD.A

CAIRO: On the opening day of WLP-Lebanon/CRTD.A’s regional conference on economic justice and women’s rights, delegates representing women’s organisations from Lebanon, Egypt, Palestine, Jordan, Bahrain and Morocco met in Cairo to discuss the implications of Egypt’s current IMF (International Monetary Fund) negotiations for women.

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Day of Action: Let’s stop sexual and gender-based violence against women and children!

Posted on 30 May 2013 by wlp

Gulbarchyn Jumabaevа of WLP Kyrgyzstan shares photos and an update on the local day of activism against sexual and gender-based violence.

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WLP Kyrgyzstan/Bir Duino Kyrgystan and civil society activists, representatives from women’s NGOs, and youth activists rallied today under the slogan: “Let’s stop sexual and gender-based violence against women and children!”

Each year the number of women and children facing violence in Kyrgyztsan increases, and the violence reported is more devastating in scale and form.

According to the Center for Assistance to Children, in the first quarter of 2013 they have already worked with 13 cases of child victims of sexual abuse. In 2011-2012 they worked with 254 children, 34 of which were victims of sexual abuse. And these figured merely represent the small portion of the population the Center is able to work with. According to an informal survey of doctors at a local children’s hospital 3-7 children are treated for injuries related to sexual assault each month.

The General Prosecutors Office reports that in 2011 there were 22 cases of domestic violence related suicides.

WLP Kyrgyzstan feels the hour has come when the whole community must say NO to violence against children and women, to demand the authorities take strong and effective measures and steps to improve the situation.

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WLP Central Asia Regional Training – An Indescribable Experience

Posted on 16 May 2013 by wlp

WLP guest-author, Bahriniso Shamsieva, is a Mine Action Project Assistant for the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, Tajikistan Office and also an activist with local NGO Marriage and the Family. She joined women from Kazakhstan,  Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, and Tajikistan at the WLP Central Asia Regional Training of Trainers Institute on Women’s Leadership and Political Participation in Shymkent, Kazakhstan this April as a participant. Bahriniso shares her reflections from the training below.

Bahriniso

Dear sister! I want to share my impressions on the WLP leadership training seminar in Shymkent, Kazakhstan. I have the most vivid and warm memories of the event, because it was an amazing opportunity to meet with so many unique women—both from neighboring Central Asian countries as well as from abroad. I realized that women around the world have shared vision for the world and our problems are very similar. And we can all easily understand each other and support each other. WLP as an organization is using their knowledge and experience to help us to unite and support each other.

Personally, working with these wise and active women who share similar passions, brought me great happiness and pleasure. Meeting with politician trainers— such as Asma Khader and other no-less inspiring women leaders— face-to-face, hearing them speak, and learning so much from them was an indescribable experience.

There were three of us women from Tajikistan at this Institute, and we were so pleased to have this opportunity. At this time, Tajik women are in need of such leadership trainings, as these trainings may help change their mentality and help them realize their place and significance, and find the strength to become more active in the personal and public arenas. While many of the preconditions for this kind of change are in place in our country, women still do not use their full potential and are not very active in politics and public life.

I would like to take the opportunity to thank all of the organizers of this workshop training on behalf of the Tajik delegation and myself personally for inviting us and for this opportunity!

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Reflections from WLP Central Asia Regional Institute

Posted on 10 May 2013 by wlp

WLP guest-author, Saida Arifkhanova, is trainer and facilitator for journalists with twenty years of experience and a public relations specialist in Uzbekistan. She joined women from Kazakhstan,  Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, and Tajikistan at the WLP Central Asia Regional Training of Trainers Institute on Women’s Leadership and Political Participation in Shymkent, Kazakhstan this April as a participant. Saida shares her reflections from the training below.

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This training made a very unique impression on me. The participants of this training were beautiful and stylish women, possessing strong character and leadership qualities. Participants were instantly happy to see each other and it was clear that something invisible united them. In all, there were women from Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, and Kyrgyzstan. And there were the four of us—women from Tashkent— representing Uzbekistan.

Gradually, I learned more about those who took part in the training and realized that each of these women has a unique position, and that each is successfully serving her community. Many participants work on issues such as human rights, women’s rights, and protecting women from abuse. I could sense their resolve to act decisively to achieve social change. I could also tell that these women held harmony and calm in their hearts, so when I heard about the struggles they faced everyday in their work I felt confused.

So, I asked many of the women if they were happy. At first my direct question seemed strange to them, and they did not answer me directly. Yet, as the days went by we began to communicate more closely, and many of the women came up to me and began talking to me. Gradually, our communication became more intimate and heartfelt.

I learned that each woman has a complex history behind her—the story of what pushed them to dedicate their lives to creating change. For some, that pivotal event was the experience of an ancient tradition of custom—for example bride kidnapping in Kyrgyzstan or norms that deny women a voice and a vote, and confine her to her role in her family. Some of what I heard was new to me, as I grew up in a family where my parents always discussed issues openly and made decisions together.

Some of the participants shared first-hand accounts of recent conflict in Kyrgyzstan and human rights abuses. As they shared their experiences and their stories, I realized that these women are making history and that each hard won freedom gives them personal strength and inspiration. So many of these life stories were piercing and unique. I began to see clearly that all of our women from Uzbekistan possess the same features and abilities as our peers in other Central Asian countries, but we have been completely overwhelmed by the need to maintain stability in our country.

During this training it became obvious that our countries are no longer as  similar to one another as they had been before and our realities are quite different today. Tajikistan has experienced a war, Kyrgyzstan has been through two revolutions and many difficulties, Kazakhstan is still overcoming the sharp shock of transition, and Turkmenistan faced leadership transition. In Uzbekistan, we are still struggling to maintain our stability, at the cost of many of the gains of independence. Still, while women in our countries do not speak the same language or share the same experiences, we very clearly understand each other and can relate to each other’s adversities.

Through the training it became very obvious that all these women are educated and independent, and that they will continue to do what they do despite these adversities. However, they still benefit from this access to better tools to support them and the work that they are doing for their communities.

Namely, they benefit from acquiring special skills and knowledge of topics such as,  modern public relations technology, effective communication skills, time management skills, and techniques for developing a vision. In addition to the training provided, this may require a special training facilitated by experts in all these areas. It is obvious that these women will be able to comprehend these complex topics, and from what I saw at the training these women could benefit from even more investment in their tremendous capacities.

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Following My Dreams: Reflections from WLP’s Central Asia Regional Institute

Posted on 23 April 2013 by wlp

Maria Kolesnikova is a citizen journalist in Kyrgyzstan and a volunteer with WLP Kyrgyzstan/Bir Duino Kyrgyzstan. She joined women from Kazakhstan,  Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, and Tajikistan at the WLP Central Asia Regional Training of Trainers Institute on Women’s Leadership and Political Participation in Shymkent, Kazakhstan this April as a participant and to present on her own experiences utilizing social media for change as a citizen journalist. Maria shares her reflections from the training below.

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Malala Continues to Inspire: Local High School Art Society Auctioning Work to Support Women’s Rights

Posted on 04 February 2013 by wlp

Painting by Christina He of Poolesville High School National Honors Art Society

Painting by Christina He of Poolesville High School National Honors Art Society

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Changing Attitudes on Personal Status Codes in MENA

Posted on 28 January 2013 by wlp

by Olivia Alabaster for WLP Lebanon/CRTD.A

Two speakers from Lebanon each discussed how a unified, civil Personal Status Code would not only help protect the rights of women but that it would also combat sectarianism.

Manar Zeaitar spoke about the issue of civil marriage; recently in the news given the President’s vocal support for it after a couple announced they had held the country’s first civil marriage ceremony, in line with a 1936 decree.

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Learning Democracy: A Conversation with Egypt’s Amel Abdel Hadi

Posted on 28 January 2013 by wlp

by Olivia Alabaster for CRTD.A WLP Lebanon

On the sidelines of the conference, Amel Abdel Hadi, one of the founders of the New Woman Foundation in Egypt, spoke about her work with the coalition and the situation in her own country.

While the women’s movement has been gaining more and more support over the years, the Arab revolts have given a new dimension to the cause, Abdel Hadi said,

This revolutionary era has also strengthened the Equality Without Reservation coalition, she added.

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Challenges in Reforming the Personal Status Code: Perspectives from MENA

Posted on 28 January 2013 by wlp

By Olivia Alabaster for CRTD.A

On the second day of the conference, participants discussed the Personal Status laws, from the achievements gained so far, to the key challenges which lie ahead and how best to move forward.

3651463162_7c882e7ea3_oAsha al-Karib provided an insightful history of the Sudanese women’s movement, and explained how many of the freedoms and advances that women gained by the 1960s – equal pay, the first woman in parliament, the right to become a judge in the Supreme Court – began to disappear with the arrival of civil war in the early 1980s.

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Women must continue to fight for equal rights, conference urges

Posted on 25 January 2013 by wlp

By Olivia Alabaster for WLP Lebanon/CRTD-A

In the first session of the Equality Without Reservation conference Thursday, an emphasis was placed on the need to continuously work for women’s rights, even once conventions have been signed.sans-titre

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Activists warn that Arab women being ignored in post-revolutionary period at opening of EWR conference

Posted on 25 January 2013 by wlp

By Olivia Alabaster for WLP Lebanon/CRTD-A

While the overwhelming majority of states in the MENA region have ratified CEDAW, (only Sudan, Somalia and Palestine are not states party to the Convention to Eliminate Discrimination Against Women) many have done so with reservations or without genuine implementation on the ground.

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