Tag Archive | "youth essay contest"

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Fear — The Enemy of Gender Equality

Posted on 26 February 2010 by

Mar 8 Update: First Prize Winner in Group 2

Finalist in WLP’s Youth Essay Contest Group 2: 18-25 Years
Temitayo O, Nigeria

“Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness that most frightens us. We ask ourselves, who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, talented, fabulous? Actually, who are you not to be?…As we are liberated from our own fear, our presence automatically liberates others.” — Marianne Williamson

A woman’s fate is determined by men and women who play God. Her first gift is a doll-named-Baby with which she rehearses home maker, wife and mother. She is groomed to be a ‘proper woman’ — the silent one when the men are talking. All these in preparation for her husband’s house; is that not where all ‘good’ women end?

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Don’t Let Sexism Go Too Far

Posted on 26 February 2010 by

Finalist in WLP’s Youth Essay Contest Group 2: 18-25 Years
Shi Min T, Malaysia

Ever thought of how the issue of sexism can affect the women’s life in Malaysia?

“It is unusual for women’s issues to be touched (raised) by men
… but women are supposed to be touched by men.”
“Most single mothers were divorced as they were ‘gatal’ (flirtatious)
and therefore would not be pitied by society.”
“Toilets are like new brides after they are completed. After some time, they get a bit spoiled. Even if you do not use them frequently, you need someone to clean them every 25 minutes.”
(Sexist MPs better watch out, New Straits Times, 24th February 2009)

Malaysian politics suddenly becomes everyone’s focus, when the male Members of Parliament, or better known as MPs in Malaysia, made sexist remarks against women, the above are just to name a few. While many developing countries such as Chile, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, India and even neighbouring countries of Malaysia, like the Philippines and Indonesia have made a big leap in the effort of leveling gender equality by having woman Prime Minister or President in the countries, Malaysian women are still struggling to be given decent respect by the men whom they voted into the parliament, who are supposed to speak up for them!

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We Can Change…

Posted on 26 February 2010 by

Mar 8 Update: Second Prize Winner in Group 2

Finalist in WLP’s Youth Essay Contest Group 2: 18-25 Years
S G, UAE

As a girl growing up in Dubai, I was accustomed to strangers pinching my buttocks, beckoning me to enter their cars, and voicing their obscene paedophilic desires. Yet I never reported any of these men, to the police or even my family. Not out of shame, but because I knew I would be the one who end up being punished. Admitting to those incidents would have resulted in me being a prisoner at home, while the perpetrators would be free to roam the streets. Beneath a facade of modern, liberalised attitudes lies Dubais deep-rooted tradition of sexism.

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Round Stones or Full Rights

Posted on 26 February 2010 by

Mar 8 Update: Third Prize Winner in Group 2

Finalist in WLP’s Youth Essay Contest Group 2: 18-25 Years
Nuseir Yassin, Israel

“Never let the hand you hold, hold you down” This expression is completely true among the Arab society of women here in Israel. Though inconceivable as it may be, Arab women here in Israel, generally speaking, are facing tremendous forces trying to hold them down, yet, with great difficulty and unprecedented bravery, women that I have known are outstandingly strong before suppression by their most beloved ones.

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Women, HIV and AIDS in Uganda

Posted on 26 February 2010 by

Finalist in WLP’s Youth Essay Contest Group 2: 18-25 Years
Ndagire Irene, Uganda

In as much as the AIDS epidemic has changed the world over the years, it has no doubt had a profound effect on women in Uganda. HIV-the virus that causes AIDS has ravaged the developing world like no other scourge in history and continues to threaten the lives of many people in Africa.

It is estimated that there are about 31.3 million adults worldwide living with HIV and AIDS, around half are women, with about 98 percent of them being women living in developing countries. The epidemic has had a unique impact on women, which has been exacerbated by their role within society and their biological vulnerability to HIV infection.

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We Can Change…

Posted on 26 February 2010 by

Finalist in WLP’s Youth Essay Contest Group 2: 18-25 Years
Mutesi Jolly Uhiriwe, Uganda

INTRODUCTION

This essay is basically researched with an outlook at women’s lives in Uganda today especially women in rural areas whose voices are hushed but who make up the majority of the population. Women in Uganda face a multitude of issues, these include, illiteracy, female genital mutilation, domestic violence, forced marriages, unemployment, poor health, marginalization and discrimination. The issues affecting women in my country are so many and all important in their weight that coming up with one becomes a task in itself, but one look into the cause of all these issues reveals a persistent cause that I could term the most important issue and this is POVERTY.

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We Can Change…

Posted on 26 February 2010 by

Finalist in WLP’s Youth Essay Contest Group 2: 18-25 Years
Karim A S, USA

While many of the inequalities women suffer in the developing world are obvious, some of the greatest inequities still occur in the Western world and in the United States in particular. Though women appear to have equal rights on paper in the United States these rights do not extend to the area of economics. Most Americans do not know that compared with men, women of similar education and work experience earn 78 cents to the dollar compared to what men receive for doing the same work.1 Furthermore, the inequality between male and female earning power is even greater if the female is a minority.

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We Can Change…

Posted on 26 February 2010 by

Finalist in WLP’s Youth Essay Contest Group 2: 18-25 Years
Jennifer T, South Africa

The most important issue affecting women’s lives in South Africa is deep seated patriarchy that crosses all cultures, languages and races. Patriarchy has historically entrenched the belief that women are inferior to men, and continues to support the embodiment of this belief in daily interaction. The insidious nature of this belief allows it to go unnoticed by most people and it informs interactions between men and women. Politicians and Government do not commit themselves to its eradication in their statements, or in their actions and interactions with one another and with South African women.

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Maternal Mortality: Dying to Give Hope?

Posted on 26 February 2010 by

Mar 8 Update: Third Prize Winner in Group 2

Finalist in WLP’s Youth Essay Contest Group 2: 18-25 Years
Eyinade Adedotun, Nigeria

He fixed a trance-like stare at the poster. He couldn’t believe his eyes. He had only spoken to her only a week just before the Christmas break. The obituary read she had ‘passed on to glory’. As if to mock death, her age was conspicuously displayed beneath her picture: thirty four. It was not the ubiquitous brief illness that is wont to kill people these days. The culprit was something he had thought her hard-earned middle class status had shielded her from. She died during childbirth, leaving a baby girl in the cold.

Before now it was the stuff of cold statistics that one was quick to dismiss as the antics of fund-seeking NGO operatives who mouthed gloomy facts about hapless women who are dying daily from labour complications. Hearing in quick succession the death of two otherwise comfortable women whom I had erroneously thought were immune from the reach of maternal mortality -the exclusive preserve of the dirt poor – made me rethink the issue especially how it affects a significant part of our population.

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We Can Change…

Posted on 26 February 2010 by

Finalist in WLP’s Youth Essay Contest Group 2: 18-25 Years
Eda S, Turkey/UK

Insanlar mücadeleleriyle varolurlar“. Zeynep Gambetti, a scholar of Kurdish politics, found this comment inscribed in the visitors’ book at the Diyarbakir Art Centre’s exhibit of photographer Ami Vitale’s Kashmir photos. The phrase roughly translates as; “people come into existence through their struggles“. The struggle to “ensure the equal rights of men and women to enjoy all economic, social, cultural, civil and political rights” has indeed defined the existence of many ethnically Kurdish women in Diyarbakir and, more generally, in the south-eastern region of Turkey. The obstacles in this struggle for equality are manifold. While the efforts of Kurdish women in Turkey to overcome these obstacles have been remarkable, there is still considerable progress to be made.

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Women: Partners for Economic Development

Posted on 26 February 2010 by

Mar 11 Update: Audience Choice Award Winner in Group 2

Finalist in WLP’s Youth Essay Contest Group 2: 18-25 Years
Himali A J, Nepal

Across the cultural variety, the greater part of communities in Nepal are patriarchal — a woman’s life is strongly influenced by her father and husband — as reflected in the practice of patrilocal home, patriarchal descent, and by inheritance systems and family relations. This broadens the base for the dependency of woman in man making their economic participation feeble.

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Women and the Path Towards Equality

Posted on 26 February 2010 by

Finalist in WLP’s Youth Essay Contest Group 2: 18-25 Years
A E, Egypt/UAE

A vision of an Arab woman with an International heart

It is a gift of life which grants us treasured mentors and inspirational role models that we hold dear unto our hearts. For these people are like a strand of pearls together forming powerful examples that add a worthwhile meaning to our existence in the world. One of these models in my life is my
grandmother. Widowed at thirty-eight (when my grandfather suddenly died of a heart attack shortly after being released from a political prison), my unemployed grandmother succeeded the deep emotional, financial and social challenges of raising her seven children all by herself in a small house in downtown Cairo. One of her daughters; a perseverant and hardworking woman who never takes ‘no’ for an answer; grew up to be my very own mother.

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